Free Wi-Fi Spots Are Security Risks for the Unwary

Unsuspecting and easy to attack – users of public Wi-Fi spots are a hacker’s dream target. Cybercriminals don’t wear cat-burglar masks and striped t-shirts, so it may not be easy to see them. On the other hand, the smart user of a free Wi-Fi hotspot knows that he or she should assume that hackers are lying virtually in wait. The terrain can vary: coffee shops, airports, restaurants, libraries, bookstores, fast food outlets and even schools can all be dangerous. Unfortunately, statistics show that users in general, consumer or business, have a lot to learn if they want to bring their risk back down to reasonable levels.

Risk Management for the Masses! Or At Least For Each Project…

Risk management is one of those areas that are too often “somebody else’s responsibility”. Whether through lack of knowledge or indifference, it gets shunted off somewhere else and replaced with an approach of “it’ll be alright on the night”. Unfortunately, it frequently isn’t. Like business continuity or information security awareness, risk management should ideally be everybody’s business and accepted by each member of an organisation as an individual as well as a collective responsibility. Risk management on a per-project basis can help move the needle in the desired direction.

Look Who’s Doing Risk Management

If you’re wondering how much risk management should become part of your organisation’s rulebook, you may already be looking around to see who else is doing it. Insurers and bankers are obvious examples, because their businesses are centred on risk calculation, whether in terms of setting insurance premiums or defining credit interest rates. Many insurers are also ready to discuss risk management with potential customers in a variety of different industry sectors. These can range from agriculture and aviation to sports and transportation. However, there are other perhaps unexpected examples that show how far the concept of risk management has spread in general.